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Bloodbending: A Sort of Different Look

As I don't think I have ever said much about bloodbending as a bending art in general, I decided to make a blog out of a comment I was initially writing. So here it goes, my first blog post :)


I've often looked at most uses for things rather than associating them with how they are used (or presented) at first. That being said, I'd like to take an indepth look at bloodbending (also the art from my point of view), and hope it brings some sort of additional thought into readers of this post.

Bloodbending Use

So far we've seen bloodbending from several people, most being villainous (Hama, Yakone, Tarrlock), with the only exception -as presented in two series at least- being Katara (who, might I add, did not wish to use it); you can easily imagine an "evil version" of the Water Tribe bloodbending armies and opposers to submission when observing how it has primarily been used. However, when taking a look at the Fire Nation, who utilized common firebending (as well as numbers) to concor and oppress, you wouldn't ordinarily view the art of firebending as perverse itself. It was, as I understood it, the Fire Lord (Sozin to be specific) who fueled generations of ideals into the youths of the Fire Nation, reaching its zenith in the latter of the Hundred Year War. Nevertheless, we are looking at a sub-skill (as I've heard it called), so this makes it easier to villainize (that and its invasive nature); being that it has not been used by many others who, I believe, could potentially show a more acceptable use. I prefer to acknowledge it was first used as a desparate means of escape, rather than to harm (or some other nefarious end). Other uses could, in theory, be as follows (as I do not know whether being bloodbent is painful or it is what has been done with it):

  • The act of pushing someone from harm (I see an anxious scene of Korra pushing Mako or Bolin from the path of a train instead of the classic: push physically only to be hit oneself).
  • Police force discipline? (As I take it those metalbent wires could easily pierce flesh or bone in the wrong hands, again, try not to look at potential use).
  • Rescuing lifting someone to safety (again similar to the pushing thing, but think of how many times someone's had it just out of reach when about to fall into a snake pit ^.-)

I think you get the idea, which brings me to my next point.

Full Moon-less Bloodbending & Teaching

Hama trains Katara

Katara being taught indepth techniques by Hama.

Well, most often-then-not the founder (or creator) of something brings and incomplete art into existence (Hama's bloodbending); much like new forms of government or a draft of a research paper. Additionally, someone who founds something in their "elderly years" will usually leave the perfecting of said art to an apprentice (which was what Hama attempted to do with Katara).

As well, I am very much looking forward to how this came about (full moon-less bloodbending), being that its far from the last we'll see of this technique, and I doubt Katara taught Yakone how to do anything of the sort. As has been said, "anytime EXCEPT the full moon"— it seems more like a perversion of the art (when bloodbending is not considered a perversion already). I like to believe that not many things are evil itself, but it is the way the individual uses them; e.g. guns, money, words, etc.

Additional Thoughts

As has been said, bloodbending seen as an art (and not de facto evil) is what I prefer to be the launching point of thought; can you imagine what animal rights activists thought about the first zoos?

  • Who could have taught Yakone bloodbending (if not self-taught)?
  • Would Korra ever, if she should in the first place, learn bloodbending from Katara (if Katara would teach her regardless of intentions)?

Share your thoughts; crtique my theories; outright refute my argument; any additional input is welcome! :)

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