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Fanon Review: Air by Wordbender

This review was conducted by the Fanon Review Squad and reflects our best judgment of writing and fanon authorship quality. Please don't take offense if the review wasn't positive. We always give advice!

Omashu Rocks here with another installment of FRS:The Omashu Scoop! Today's review is of Air by Wordbender

Author's Plot: Avatar Aang and Fire Lord Zuko have worked hard to maintain the long-lasting -if at times unsteady- world peace. And for twelve years, despite skirmishes and trials, they have succeeded. But not everyone believes in the peace. The Guild of the Granite Gauntlet is determined to expose Zuko as a fraud no better than his predecessors and they will do anything to bring the Fire Nation down. In order to defeat this subversive organization, the Gaang ventures incognito into the Earth Kingdom. Meanwhile, in the Fire Nation, rebels still loyal to Sozin's ideals stir up trouble and a spy haunts the corridors of the Royal Palace. Family and friends are threatened. The peace hangs in the balance. The only hope is to discover who the true enemy is and stop them -before it's too late.

After reading the plot, you may be thinking I feel like I've read this before. Maybe you have, or maybe you've read similar fanons, as the idea of Aang and Zuko working together to maintain the peace they just created is a much overused concept. That may be an issue to some readers. If it is the type of fanon you are looking for; however, then this may be the right pick for you. It is certainly one of my favorite "post-war" stories.


Plot/Storyline: We’ve all read about factions unhappy with the outcome of the war rising up and Earthbenders trying to get revenge. 8.9
Organization: Some parts can be a bit confusing, but Wordbender generally does a good job here. 9.3
Creativity: A fanon with the A:TLA characters and the all-to-common theme of rebellious Firebenders rising and Earthbenders seeking revenge cannot a great score, sorry. I will give credit though for a few unique ideas here and there. 8.5
Action: At first, there isn't much, but it does pick up. The fights aren't the most thrilling I've read but the descriptions are OK. 8.8
Interest Level: This fanon was hard to dive into, mostly because of the common plot, but the story picks up in A Kettle Set to Boil and becomes very intriguing and exciting quickly. 9.3
Character Development: Unfortunately, this category wasn't particularly impressive. That being said, it wasn't too shabby either. 8.7
Believability: I think the representations of the A:TLA characters need improvement (something I struggle with myself), but there are no concepts that are hard to imagine occurring in the Avatar world. 8.9
General Writing: Wordbender uses some nice vocab and descriptions. A few sentences seem repetitive or awkward. 9.2

Average Score: 8.9
Note:All Scores Are Out Of Ten

What Wordbender does right: Wordbender is a good writer, don't bet me wrong. In fact, his literary abilities act as a saving grace. As the name implies, Wordbender has quite a colorful vocabulary and the fanons descriptions are not bad at all. It is important that readers of this review realize that Wordbender does not lack talent, but any plot that so closely follows the generic post-war storyline his hard to work with (see below).

What Wordbender could improve on: The biggest problem that I found when writing my first fanon (which turned into a miserable failure) was that people simply did not want to read a typical post-war fanon from a lesser-known author. Now, I've read each of this fanon's chapters and there certainly are creative and unique aspects, but if the overall theme isn't something that jumps out, it will be difficult to find readers. HOWEVER, there is hope. It is time to think BIG. The fanon has villains and factions, yes, but it is time for something bigger than life to show up and shake things up forever.

Who does Air to? If you like post-war fanons, and don't find anything cliche or boring about them, then I promise you will like Air. To elaborate, if this review was done under the premise that all fanons had post-war plots, the scores would be much higher, because the story really does perform well in that sense.

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