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  • This is one problem that I had with the show, it visits only three of the four nations(one of which is being rebuilt) while spending the most of its time in a completely new city. 

    Normally I would have no problem with the show taking place in republic city for the most part. However, it does little to actually show what the city is like. This could be helpful in order to emphasize the bender vs. non-bender discrimination/crime happening within the city. In season two it was implied that there was a Water Tribe community in RC however it is never shown in the actual show. It would be cool to take a tour through the city and see the ethnic immigrant neighborhoods.

    Lastly, I will say that LoK did a good job with modernizing certain areas such as the SWT or Ba Sing Se, with that said however, it really annoys me how the FN was not visited once and that there are very few characters shown that are actually from the FN. In ATLA, the it was the most technologically advanced of all nations. Given that LoK has alot of emphasis on the world advancing technologically, it would be cool to see where they are at now. Also, alot of the FN was affected by the war culturally(this was shown in the headband) and economically (this was shown in the painted lady) which still leaves many unanswered questions about what it's like now. 

    PS. This thread was originally going to be titled "Why was the Fire Nation not included in LOK"

    PPS. I hate to bash Legend of Korra and in fact I like it more than most, however I think it has so much potential that it missed (for various reasons).

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    • I'd argue that the short-arc format did some damage in that regard.  Hopefully, the comics will at least somewhat remedy that.

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    • Really, the Fire Nation complaint is the only one that makes much sense.

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    • World building is something like "let's meet the history, mythology and culture of the fantasy world, precisely, and it develops through multiple episode, so we don't get too much information at once" ? It is a guess.

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    • Ehh.  The Fire Nation is the main thing I wish they'd explored, but I also would kind of liked to have seen more of the layout of Republic City.

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    • I think Republic City was pretty well explored. We've seen the park, police station, industrial area, downtown, strip mall, underground tunnels, docks...there's really not much more I could ask for.

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    • I don't see the point in exploring places that don't really need to be explored again. LoK didn't lack worldbuilding if you ask me, it just emphasized on different things. We got a lot of world-building from Republic City, Zaofu, the Wan two-parter, the Southern Water Tribe, the spirit world etc. I admit it would have been interesting to see what post-war Fire Nation looks like, but it's not really necessary from a narrative perspective. After all, the writers wanted LoK to be its own thing, not ATLA 2.0.

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    • Kimathite
      Kimathite removed this reply because:
      I wasn't finished
      17:38, May 16, 2018
      This reply has been removed
    • Neo Bahamut wrote:
      I think Republic City was pretty well explored. We've seen the park, police station, industrial area, downtown, strip mall, underground tunnels, docks...there's really not much more I could ask for.

      We never learned what made that city unique to the show (outside of the bending obviously) at the  end of the day Republic city could easily be a regular cartoon city. 

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    • Kimathite wrote:
      Neo Bahamut wrote:
      I think Republic City was pretty well explored. We've seen the park, police station, industrial area, downtown, strip mall, underground tunnels, docks...there's really not much more I could ask for.
      We never learned what made that city unique to the show (outside of the bending obviously) at the  end of the day Republic city could easily be a regular cartoon city. 

      I disagree. Republic City was clearly the pinnacle of modernization and industry. The city is pretty much defined by how different it is from other cities around the world. Such as its unique architectures based on various cultures and influenced by industrialization,

      The city does in some ways correspond to Korra's mentality and her situation in Book 1. She's a master of water, fire and earth, types of bending you commonly see in the city. The city lacks an airbending population, reflecting Korra's difficulty with mastering air. And like a true Water Tribal, Korra welcomes change and has a great sense of community, just as Republic City is a place where multiple ethnicities live together in peace. And that's one of the major reasons why Republic City was the setting of Book 1. The city reflected the modern world and Korra's personality.

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    • This is New York, this is Chicago, & I literally could not tell you the difference.

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    • Neo Bahamut wrote:
      This is New York, this is Chicago, & I literally could not tell you the difference.

      I'm not just talking about visuals I'm also speaking about it's culture and ways of life

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    • Fantasy 1920's.

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    • Hunprincess wrote:
      World building is something like "let's meet the history, mythology and culture of the fantasy world, precisely, and it develops through multiple episode, so we don't get too much information at once" ? It is a guess.

      So am I right or not, because I don't know.

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    • Worldbuilding is the process of adding details to an imaginary world to make it feel more plausible. There are a lot of different ways you can go about it.

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    • Hunprincess wrote:
      Hunprincess wrote:
      World building is something like "let's meet the history, mythology and culture of the fantasy world, precisely, and it develops through multiple episode, so we don't get too much information at once" ? It is a guess.
      So am I right or not, because I don't know.

      I'd actually second that.  I mean, Neo, you cool and all; but "fantasy 1920s" is a vague concept, not a setting. 

      Although, to be honest: what would be better than more detail on Republic City—and I mean a lot better—would have been other parts of the United Republic as a whole.  True, we got a lot of world-building in A:TLA; but, while I certainly won't say that this is like Pathfinder vs. Starfinder (it's a matter of decades rather than of millennia, for one): it remains that the timeline has advanced and the world has changed drastically, but we were given less of a sense of that than we could have been were it not for the short-arc format.  (For example: there's a whole new nation which was barely in its infancy even in the comics.)

      I mean, I certainly won't feign a lack of bias; I'm a sucker for world-building.  Even so.

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    • We know its major locations, architecture, government system, recent history, fashion, basic socioeconomic facts, entertainment, a few public figures, technology, frankly what we know about it rivals if not exceeds any other single location in the entire franchise. Many of these details are very specific, if not unique to the setting, so it shouldn't be hard at all to distinguish Republic City from other locations, especially in the same franchise.

      Plus, when you get down to it, people aren't really that special. Sure if you compare say Mumbai to London, they're going to be very different, but if compare 2 cities of similar cultural & temporal background, there's not really going to be that much separating them. Sure, there are certain differences in social norms that people cite between large American cities, but on the other hand they tend to have similar politics, a similar background in people moving to be closer to industrial or technical jobs, they obviously have the same general government structures, so really how distinguishing can any particular regional customs be? Y'know, do you recognize New York more based on how the people there act, or because it's the one with the big statue & the big tower?

      Point being, a "culture" is really just a description of a group of people & their shared societal context. All the little details we know about Republic City ARE its culture, & if you want to get to the heart of what it's like, well it's kind of like a 1920's city with a general Asian vibe, looser social attitudes, & more magic. There are more specific details, but yes it's going to broadly share traits with other 20th century style cities, because that is the context that shaped it. To the extent that "culture" is some kind of abstract concept separate from the basic facts about the city & the people living there, "fantasy 1920's" pretty much is...that thing I just said.

      Now, if you want to get into the United Republic apart from its capital city, that's a different beast. It certainly seems to have been treated as an afterthought at best, with Republic City most often functioning indistinguishably from some kind of city-state, even though we know that's not supposed to be the case. But the city itself is pretty much the least weak portion of the worldbuilding.

      Nor am I really convinced the short arc format had much to do with it. If you doubled the lengths of Books 1 & 2, then they probably would've stayed in mostly the same locations, just done more there, & Books 3 & 4 might not have happened at all. Also, a thing I forgot to respond to:

      I don't see the point in exploring places that don't really need to be explored again.

      So much time has elapsed that those can hardly be said to be the same locations anymore, & if it IS the case that very little has changed--such as with the Earth Kingdom in Book 3--then that itself is an interesting fact which raises the question of "why not." It's true that it's not strictly "necessary" to see those other locations, but you don't really do worldbuilding because it's necessary to the narrative, you do it because it gives the audience more of an understanding of the world in which the narrative is set & makes it feel more "real" to them. It's really not asking too much to see the updated Fire Nation, just write a plot device that needs Korra to go to the Fire Nation, Hell they were halfway there in Book 2.

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    • The Avatar world has been build since 2005 so there's nothing to build. LoK showcased how the world changed since Aang's time and there's nothing to add further as the world is already beautiful as it is.

      Come to think of it... Zaofu? Rebuild Southern Water Tribe? Rebuilt Air Temples? Republic City?

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