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  • These very Concepts really bother me that i nearly gave up on entire brand of the show!

    1. Uncle Iroh is still "alive" within the spirits world! somehow....just WTF?!!

    2. The Spirit world isn't Spiritual. It's a realm that you can physically go to. A place that you can Literally touch, feel, smell, hear, ect.

    3. Dead people can go to the spirit world if they choose to which violates the concept of death.

    4. Somehow the spirits can interact with the physical world.

    5. Uncle iroh already knows korra even when he shouldn't cause he died way before she was born!

    6. Spirit Portals! just bullshit writing! stupid spirit portals!

    7. Korra recovery from mercury toxic poison which should of left permanent damage on your body but mainly in her fatty tissues and her brain. She SHOULD of been shown to have mental disorder, partial blindness and kidney failure. BUT NOOOOO!!!!!!

    8. raava/vaatu is just a copy & paste character of Tui/La.

    well guess these were the ones that ruined the show for me. just me but idk if anyone else agrees.

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    • 1. Iroh had, like, two scenes. And I always thought it made sense he'd become some sort of spirtual adviser.

      2. Which is a bad thing for what reason?

      3. I think you have to go there before you die.

      4. Which happened before, during Aangs run.

      5. Isn't Korra the link to the spirit-realm? You'd think the spirits would know about a new Avatar.

      6. I'm starting to feel like you didn't like what the showrunners did with the spirit-realm.

      7. Katara should have gotten a permantent scar, back when Aang accidentally hurt her with fire. She didn't, because there is healing magic in the world of Avatar. Also, Avatars probably have a different physiology than normal humans. Otherwise Aang wouldn't have gotten away with just a scar after Azula tried to electrocute him.

      8. No, Tui and La were spirits of the Moon and the Sea, whereas Raava and Vaatu are spirits of Light and Darkness.

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    • 1. I mean, I'm no expert, but he probably did it through what he literally explained in the episode, about him crossing over to the Spirit World after his death, since he was always in touch with the Spirits.

      2. It was always another realm that could be interacted with, I fail to why it's okay for Aang to do so with a simulated spiritual body, but not for Korra to do it with a fleshy body.

      3. No, it happened to ONE person, who was already previously established to be able to enter the Spirit World, & to repeat myself, clearly explained that this is how he was able to do it. It's not something anyone can do, it requires sufficient spiritual enlightenment, which is in keeping with the eastern mysticism theme.

      4. Like Heibai. Or Tui & La. Or Wan Shi Ton. Seriously, did you watch the original show?

      5. Firstly, I can't find anything confirming Iroh's date of death, & secondly, he's still around in the Spirit World, & she's been known to be the Avatar just in the human world for about 13 years. He could easily obtain this information.

      6. Well, if calling something "stupid" & "bullshit" is a viable argument, then that's my response to this point.

      7. Complete recovery is very much a possible outcome of mercury poisoning, & we could sit here & debate what her odds should be given her amount of exposure, but honestly I don't think you're a doctor & I don't think any of these statistics take into account having a magical superpowered mode or being exposed to magical magicians who can magically suck out the poison. What I'm saying is that there's magic, it shouldn't be asking too much to suspend your disbelief, so long as the magic is consistent, which it is. It brought Aang back from the dead once!

      8. Uh, no? Other than the Yin/Yang theme, they have nothing in common.

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    • Did Iroh actually die before crossing over to the spirit realm. I thought he just went like "Yeah, I'm done here, goodbye, physical body!"

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    • One would assume you have to cross over before you die, it's more a question of if he was going to die anyway, or if he just allowed his physical body to waste away while he was gallivanting through the Spirit World.

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    • Honestly, these elements don't bug me nearly as much as they did you apparently. 

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    • Well, there are those stories about old people that die after they feel they're done with what they wanted to do in their life. As if they decided to die their natural death at this specific time. Like, my grand-grandmother wanted to see my father in his millitary-uniform. And after she'd seen them, she died in her sleep a few weeks after. I imagine Iroh decided, at somepoint, that he was done with the mortal realm, so he lied down, closed his eyes and entered the spirit realm, leaving his body to succumb to biological death.

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    • I kinda hate the Raava concept. Changed a lot of what the Avatar was in how they did it.

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    • Gotta admit, I'm not a fan of Season 2 in general.

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    • Yeah, Season 2 kind of sucked. Still better than Season 1 though. Sort of. 

      Bloodbending allowing you to perform Energybending to me is one of the stupidest things in TLOK. Not entirely positive how that even makes sense, and I expected something a little more shocking than something we've already seen to explain Amon's ability. I could not stand that revelation. 

      And I've gone on enough about my disgust at most of the technology mixed into the setting, even if that to me is the concept that to me hurts the ride the most. And that's all I will say of it. 

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    • Bloodbending allowing you to perform Energybending to me is one of the stupidest things in TLOK. Not entirely positive how that even makes sense

      It doesn't. It's also not what happened. Amon affected the brain in a way that negated bending. This produces a similar effect to how Aang removed Ozai's bending, but is not actually the same ability. For one thing, Amon cannot give bending. It's akin to the difference between gliding & flying.

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    • Still not entirely sure I buy it. The whole logic was so hackneyed. Especially since it failed to prevent Korra from airbending shortly after the fact. If your logic is true, then she should've been completely screwed I think. 

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    • It's not really a question of "if it's true," because it's not "my logic," it's just what happened. On that note, Amon couldn't affect Korra's airbending ability, because she didn't have it yet. She knew the maneuvers, but the mental component that made airbending work hadn't developed yet, hence why she couldn't airbend even when she attempted to. She was only able to achieve that after her other bending arts were removed, in her desperation to save Mako.

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    • That's still stretching it. Regardless, the Bloodbending revelation seemed way too convenient an explanation for all this. I'm still trying to sort out the logistics of it. 

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    • Does that mean Amons bending-block is very likely to cause aneurysms? I mean, he controls blood. And controlling blood inside the human brain seems risky, to say the least.

      Wouldn't that be a dark twist? Korra, dying young because of an Amoneurysm?

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    • Implord wrote:
      Does that mean Amons bending-block is very likely to cause aneurysms? I mean, he controls blood. And controlling blood inside the human brain seems risky, to say the least.

      Wouldn't that be a dark twist? Korra, dying young because of an Amoneurysm?

      I would think so, yes. 

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    • To think about how many people might have died in the test-runs. The dedication Amon must have had, to improve all the way over what may be piles of corpses, is somewhat inspiring.

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    • It's not blood, per se, that bloodbenders control; it's any of the extracellular liquid.  That said: Amonatak's little stunt has had to have had a body count nonetheless.

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    • I didn't like his mask.

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    • Implord wrote:
      Did Iroh actually die before crossing over to the spirit realm. I thought he just went like "Yeah, I'm done here, goodbye, physical body!"

      More like, BEFORE he was going to die, when his physical body couldn't stay anymore, he meditated to the Spirit World, and stayed there, leaving his body behind to die.

      Summary: His physical body died, but before that he went to the SW.

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    • Implord wrote:
      1. Iroh had, like, two scenes. And I always thought it made sense he'd become some sort of spirtual adviser.

      2. Which is a bad thing for what reason?

      3. I think you have to go there before you die.

      4. Which happened before, during Aangs run.

      5. Isn't Korra the link to the spirit-realm? You'd think the spirits would know about a new Avatar.

      6. I'm starting to feel like you didn't like what the showrunners did with the spirit-realm.

      7. Katara should have gotten a permantent scar, back when Aang accidentally hurt her with fire. She didn't, because there is healing magic in the world of Avatar. Also, Avatars probably have a different physiology than normal humans. Otherwise Aang wouldn't have gotten away with just a scar after Azula tried to electrocute him.

      8. No, Tui and La were spirits of the Moon and the Sea, whereas Raava and Vaatu are spirits of Light and Darkness.

      totally agree

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    • and you know (the one that posted this forum), in a world where people can bend and do a lot of fantasy things, the thinking about if the poison hurt korra doesn't make sence. you can't compair it to humans. just like what the firt comment said about katara. 

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    • No another dense Korra hater who knows very little of the lore:

      1. Iroh meditated his way to the Spirit World, leaving his physical body to rot.
      2. If this is Bryke's definition of a spirit, leave it be.
      3. See #1.
      4. So what? There are still spirits in the mortal world (Mother of Faces, Tui and La)
      5. Friendships transcend lifetimes?
      6. Unless you provide a sound argument that they are objectively bad, your views are nothing short of tasteless.
      7. Zaheer: "The poison should have killed you, but you were able to fight it off." Also, you missed the fact that Korra is of muscular built, she's physically resilient in any combat situation. Sure she wasn't trained to handle mercury but she was able too fight it off. If it was any other person, they should've been dead.
      8. Again, so what?
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    • IAmNothing712 wrote:
      No another dense Korra hater who knows very little of the lore:

      Are you into diplomacy, by chance?

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    • You've obviously been brainwashed by E;R's whiny bs nonsensical arguments.

      1. What's so bad about that? I'm pretty sure ATLA elaborated on the possibility of ascending your physical form and become a spirit, like Yue, the Painted Lady and Lady Tienhai. The way I interpreted this is that the Spirit World shares some concepts with Nirvana. If I'm not mistaken, Buddhists believe that once you've become enlightened enough, you'll break the reincarnation cycle and enter Nirvana. Basically what Iroh did. He became a spirit because he was ready and because he chose to.

      2. Uh...yeah it is. In fact, it's even MORE spiritual than depicted in ATLA. In ATLA, the spirit world was depicted as an astral realm inhabited by supernatural entities and pretty much just existed to explain where spirits came from. ALoK takes that concept to a higher level and shows that the spirit world is in some ways a living, breathing world with entirely different laws of physics that humans are not likely to comprehend. Not only that, but also elaborates on the fact that the spirit world is basically what you want it to be. That is, everything you find there is only what you take with you. The spirit world appeared to be dark and nightmarish to Korra because she was afraid of it. But once Iroh explained the nature of the spirit world to her, she saw the more peaceful and beautiful aspect of the spirit world. And of course you can touch, smell, hear etc. Like I said, the spirit world is what you make of it. Regardless of whether you enter it physically or not.

      3. The spirit world is not really an afterlife. If you're referring to Iroh, he became a spirit because he chose to. Not because he died. The concept of death has never been fully explored in the Avatar lore, but it is heavily implied that reincarnation or rebirth is a part of it. So you can't really say it violates a concept that was never really elaborated on before.

      4. They have always been able to do that. Even in ATLA. Hei Bai was terrorizing a village because his forest was destroyed and I seem to remember Wan Shi Tong erecting a whole library for mortals to enter.

      5. It was never implied Iroh knew everything about Korra. He only knew who she is and that she's the Avatar. And the Avatar has great affinity to spirits. I mean, Koh knew who Aang was when they first met.

      6. Care to explain how they're bullshit writing or what's supposedly so bad about them? If anything, the portals match the lore. Like Pathik said, "separation is the greatest illusion." because the material world and the spirit world are just branches of the same tree.

      7. The same argument could be made about Aang, who should have been paralyzed after Azula shot him. But since you don't understand the concept of suspension of disbelief (which is essential for all works of fiction), I guess I should tell you that Zaheer himself admitted that Korra was able to fight off the poison and she did nevertheless suffer quite a lot even though Su got the poison out. Also, she DID develop a mental disorder called PTSD. Didn't you watch Korra Alone, The Coronation, The Calling, The Battle of Zaofu and Beyond the Wilds?

      8. No they're not. They have completely different roles. Tui and La keep the balance between the moon and the ocean, without which would result in a catastrophe that would kill countless people from every corner of the world. Raava and Vaatu are the ones who decide the fate of the worlds. Raava preserves the worlds by maintaining peace while Vaatu destroys the worlds by spreading chaos. Raava and Vaatu's roles are more important than Tui and La's. Because Tui and La only serve the material world. While Raava and Vaatu are essential to existence itself.

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    • This mostly looks like put-upon-fan griping. The only concepts that damaged (not ruined, but damaged) LoK: 

      1) The reletively complete character arc Korra had in Book 1, which made her attitude in the beginning of Book 2 feel kind of clumsy. 

      2) 12-episode seasons. 

      3) Nickelodeon's horrendous release schedule. I can't imagine what was going on at the executive level, but it feels like sabotage (though it was likely just rank incompetence). 

      4) Not enough flashbacks featuring Sokka. 

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    • Mrsunrider wrote:
      This mostly looks like put-upon-fan griping. The only concepts that damaged (not ruined, but damaged) LoK: 

      1) The reletively complete character arc Korra had in Book 1, which made her attitude in the beginning of Book 2 feel kind of clumsy. 

      2) 12-episode seasons. 

      3) Nickelodeon's horrendous release schedule. I can't imagine what was going on at the executive level, but it feels like sabotage (though it was likely just rank incompetence). 

      4) Not enough flashbacks featuring Sokka. 

      Huh, I'll say. I don't think Nick knew a damn about what they were doing. 

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    • blah blah blah not enough  ATLA references blah blah blah

      I can't take this post seriously. 

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    • IAmNothing712
      IAmNothing712 removed this reply because:
      05:21, March 20, 2018
      This reply has been removed
    • I believe the creators said Amon blocks chi paths using waterbending, like a way of "anti-healing," if you will. That's not exactly what they said, but it's in an interview.

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    • Chix777 wrote:
      I believe the creators said Amon blocks chi paths using waterbending, like a way of "anti-healing," if you will. That's not exactly what they said, but it's in an interview.

      He uses bloodbending, blocking the chi-paths thanks to his knowledge on chi-blocking.

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    • Yes, that's it.

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    • The reasons why Korra still had airbending are:

      1. She didn't unlock the chi-paths related to airbending, so Amon couldn't block them cause the weren't open

      2. Amon didn't have experience on removing airbending

      That's unrelated to the topic but I just anted to leave that clear before anything

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    • I don't think she 'still had' airbending, rather, she didn't have it at all until everything else was taken; the mental and spiritual state losing her bending left her in opened her to unlocking it.

      Maybe a scientific equivalent would be to forming new synaptic pathways or, in her case, new chi pathways. 

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    • The whole execution of that is just ridiculous. 

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    • Implord wrote:

      IAmNothing712 wrote:
      No another dense Korra hater who knows very little of the lore:

      Are you into diplomacy, by chance?

      Not with you.

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    • So what? 

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    • IAmNothing712 wrote:

      Implord wrote:

      IAmNothing712 wrote:
      No another dense Korra hater who knows very little of the lore:
      Are you into diplomacy, by chance?
      Not with you.

      What did I ever do to you? :(

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    • One thing I'd like to add is that I'm largely displeased with the overall theme of the show post book 1. This being "all the villains were ultimately right, but misguided, all the Avatars were idiots who handled everything incorrectly despite good intentions, and Korra is the biggest idiot of them all." That's what it looks like to me, at least.

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    • Avatar Beta wrote:
      One thing I'd like to add is that I'm largely displeased with the overall theme of the show post book 1. This being "all the villains were ultimately right, but misguided, all the Avatars were idiots who handled everything incorrectly despite good intentions, and Korra is the biggest idiot of them all." That's what it looks like to me, at least.

      It's definitely given off that vibe more than once. Honestly, LOK is way too political for its own good. 

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    • Yes, because complex villians that don't just laugh evilly are somehow a bad thing...

      ...uh, what?

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    • Complex villains are nice, I agree, but it can sometimes be tto much. I mean, they went out of their way to give everyone against Korra valid arguments and have her come to agree with them to some extent. The hero can be wrong sometimes, but not everytime. 

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    • The hero can certainly be partially wrong every time, that's--that's the whole point of a character arc--that's what those are. Also, is this the part where I explain that Fire Eater can generally be counted on to hate Legend of Korra on nearly any pretext, & he gets mad at me for pointing it out?

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    • Avatar Beta wrote:
      Complex villains are nice, I agree, but it can sometimes be tto much. I mean, they went out of their way to give everyone against Korra valid arguments and have her come to agree with them to some extent. The hero can be wrong sometimes, but not everytime. 

      But Korra wasn't wrong...? Not in regards to the villains, anyway. She was plenty of wrong in other contexts, and often the writers had her act stupid for the plot's sake, but that's a different discussion.

      The thing, just because those villains often had a point doesn't mean they were right. Let's look at them:

      Amon: He definitely had a point. The Republic Council was made up entirely of benders, and when they felt their privileged position threatened, they reacted with harsh measures against the entire non-bender population, privileging the bender population. However, he also forcefully took away bending powers from people and had planned to extend his violent anti-bending crusade to the whole world, so even though he had a point, he was ultimately wrong and had to be stopped (and hence Korra was right to oppose him).

      (In fact, I'd say what the first season suffered from most is that Amon's points get mostly glanced over *even though* they are justified. A more complex plot would have been nice here. And yes, season 1 only had 12 episodes, that hurt, but they wasted two of them on a friggen tournament arc...)

      Unnaloq: That guy didn't even have a point to begin with. He was just a crazy edgelord trying to become the dark messiah.No wonder season 2 was the weakest Korra season by far.

      Zaheer: Looking at the Earth Queen's regime, he has a point - and yet he is still utimately wrong as proven by Kuvira: All he did was to create a power vacuum into which a dictator stepped. So, once again: Has a point, but ultimately wrong (and hence Korra right to oppose him).

      Kuvira: Did stabilize the Earth Kingdom, did end banditry and hunger, but ultimately was a tyrant who achieved this by military force, conquering territories against their will, and even employing *re-education camp* - GULAGs, that is. Her successes is the point she had, but the Metal Clan and the Republic didn't *want* to become part of her domain, and so Korra was right to oppose her.

      In none of those cases was Korra wrong. Just because the villains have a point doesn't mean the hero is wrong. It just means the villains are not cardboard cutouts, and that's a good thing. Well, except Unnaloq - and he was by far the weakest, worst written villain. If there is one single thing where Korra is better than ATLA (and I would say on the whole ATLA is far better) it's the villains. At least Amon and Kuvira, who are far better written than Ozai.

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    • Unnaloq: That guy didn't even have a point to begin with. He was just a crazy edgelord trying to become the dark messiah.No wonder season 2 was the weakest Korra season by far.

      Unalaq wanted people to live with spirits, by means of being a crazy edgelord trying to become the dark messiah.

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    • Korra had moments in Book 1 in which she just Did Not Get It.  And her judgment was not allowed to be any good throughout the first half of Book 2.  Although those weren't a matter of her being wrong and the villain being right, I'd still say those were instances in which she was wrong.

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    • Stop deflecting, Neo Bahamut. Nobody here has the time for that anymore. 

      Okay so long story short, the villains' ends don't justify the means, even with whatever good points they might have made before carrying out the means. And the same can apply to the heroes too. This is nothing new. 

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    • Yep, & here's the part where he accuses me of some nonsense because he can't refute what I actually said due to the fact that it's true, & then swears he doesn't care, he could ignore me any time he wanted, really.

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    • Nobody has time for this crap anymore pal, so save it. And stay focused on the topic or move on to another. 

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    • You're right, I don't have time for this crap. All I did was point out a bias you yourself admit you have. You can't forbid me from talking about subjects you don't like, especially when they're true, & the fact that you keep trying got old a while ago. Notice that I don't do that to you? Not once in any of these threads have I told you to save your crap, even when you weren't strictly on the original topic.

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    • Fire Eater wrote:
      Stop deflecting, Neo Bahamut. Nobody here has the time for that anymore. 

      Okay so long story short, the villains' ends don't justify the means, even with whatever good points they might have made before carrying out the means. And the same can apply to the heroes too. This is nothing new. 

      No, it isn't. But that means the accusation against TLOK that it leaves the heroine always wrong by making the villains partially in the right is... well, incorrect.

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    • Octo8 wrote:
      Fire Eater wrote:
      Stop deflecting, Neo Bahamut. Nobody here has the time for that anymore. 

      Okay so long story short, the villains' ends don't justify the means, even with whatever good points they might have made before carrying out the means. And the same can apply to the heroes too. This is nothing new. 

      No, it isn't. But that means the accusation against TLOK that it leaves the heroine always wrong by making the villains partially in the right is... well, incorrect.

      Well yeah I mean, we gonna justify the terrorism carried out by Amon and Zaheer just because they had visions for a fairer and more balanced society, which could not be reconciled with what is the humane thing to do outside of their respective aims? Throwing the EK into anarchy and trying to strip the Airbenders of their abilities in a public display automatically nullifies whatever valid pointrs they may or may not have had in realizing their unrealistic aims for the world. 

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    • If the villain has a point, it is not "nullified" by the villain playing their allotted role.  To claim as much is to at best claim that "villain has a point" is a contradiction in terms, and at worst smacks of deflection.  The only thing which nullifies "villain has a point" is if that supposed point turns out to not be real. Amonatak was doing what he was doing because ableism against nonbenders was canonically real.  That does not justify his bloodbending and spiritually mutilating people.

      Zaheer was doing what he was doing because authoritarian policies (as implemented by The Queen is a Fink) which were hurting people were not only canonically but explicitly real (and the fact that he was carrying on with a former child soldier probably only reinforced that).  That does not justify his suffocating people, taking hostages, or indirectly causing Kuvira to happen.

      And also?  The villain having a valid point does not mean that the protagonist is somehow "wrong."  Because the villain is still doing it wrong—valid point or no.

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    • I dunno, I think the Earth Queen kinda had it coming.

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    • Anyone who still keeps the treacherous Dai Li in power does have it coming. But it wasn't a coup, their plan was essentially letting the chicken fend without its head. Which you could say is where the logic in their plan fails. 

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    • Not really. Zaheer knew a breakdown of authority would lead to chaos. But he wanted that state of affairs. He exalted chaos as the natural order of things. The only state of affairs where people can be truly free.

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    • An unrealistic ideal in just about any society today. 

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    • Neo Bahamut wrote:
      I dunno, I think the Earth Queen kinda had it coming.

      The Earth Queen did kind of have it coming.  And, personally: I think she'd have made a better primary antagonist than a superantivillain team of ruthless and wrongheaded but essentially well-meaning strawnarchists.  Alter her character slightly so that she's both reasonably competent and genuinely concerned regarding what she sees as the "theft" of Earth Kingdom territory, and there you go (although it would have made Kuvira redundant).

      Still: Zaheer suffocating her slowly so that he could monologue (which she wouldn't have heard in a vacuum anyway), as opposed to P'Li blasting her, Ghazan wrapping her in rock and melting it, or Ming-Hua slitting her throat with an icicle?  That was unnecessarily cruel.

      Octo8 wrote:
      Not really. Zaheer knew a breakdown of authority would lead to chaos. But he wanted that state of affairs. He exalted chaos as the natural order of things. The only state of affairs where people can be truly free,

      Then again, we already knew that Zaheer is an idealistic dipshit who's baffled by the idea of not everyone being Chaotic Good (despite not being Chaotic Good himself).

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    • He had a dramatic point to make.

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    • Eh, nobody misses her anyway. How could she possibly be the daughter of Kuei? Yikes. 

      Still getting the wind literally sucked out of your lungs IS so disturbing it comes back to seriously make you cringe. 

      Zaheer didn't get that order and leadership are natural instincts for the society where he felt those things no longer had a place. It's a human thing. Can't really suppress it for long. 

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    • Neo Bahamut wrote:
      He had a dramatic point to make.

      Obviously.  It remains that The Queen is a Fink wouldn't have been able to hear it in a vacuum; therefore, it comes off more like he was showboating for the minibosses than anything else.

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    • I hope he extended the same courtesy to the Dai Li. 

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    • How could she possibly be the daughter of Kuei? Yikes.

      Condoms aren't perfect.

      Obviously. It remains that The Queen is a Fink wouldn't have been able to hear it in a vacuum; therefore, it comes off more like he was showboating for the minibosses than anything else.

      Could be, I mean she didn't need to hear it, seeing as she was gonna be dead soon. But maybe there was just enough air getting through to hear it. Or not--either way.

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    • Obviously not, apparently. 

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    • An anonymous contributor
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