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  • continuing the misplaced stuff from the rumors and updates thread]], i think it would be good for the franchise if bryke could take it elsewhere to another network. less restrictions.

    does bryke have any ownership in avatar? i remember them saying that nick wanted a fantasy blahblahwhateveritwas...so did nick approach them and say write something for us or did they approach nick and say hey we have an idea.

    how could one not have ownership of their own creation? i saw that vid hasdi, and i understand the production company's point of view, but if the company owns everything, why do they even bother with the creator at all; why don't' they just make it themselves? there was something in there about the company changing the ending/plot...how much control does each party have over that?

    so much of this stuff is ridiculous...

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    • Kubernes wrote:
      They could always develop something new for another network.

      Mike and Bryan have to be careful not to make it too similar to ATLA and TLoK. Otherwise, Viacom can sue Mike and Bryan for plagiarizing their own work. Yes, I am aware how absurd that sounds but that's "work for hire" to you.

      Neo Bahamut wrote:
      I'm reminded of several instances where shows continue on in some form after the network has cancelled them. One particular example is "Gargoyles," which Greg Weisman wasn't even credited for, & was his first major production, so he wasn't exactly "a Nolan" of cartoon writing.

      Gargoyles is a good show, being a fan of Keith David as well who voiced Goliath. It continued in the comics from Slave Labor Graphics (SLG) because SLG licensed it from Disney and hired Weisman to expand on the Gargoyles continuity. When Disney raised the licensing fees, SLG opt to let it lapse in August 31, 2008. Weisman later pled the fans (on April 6, 2009) to buy the republished comics to demonstrate a viable market for SLG [1] but in the end, it was not enough to justify any relicensing. Time will tell if history repeats itself with the Airbender franchise.

      Intelligence4 wrote:
      does bryke have any ownership in avatar?

      They have as much ownership as any of us, so NO. If they want to do anything with it without Viacom's permission, they have to wait 95 years like the rest of us. As creators, they get some residuals if the show continued without them, though it is not enough to pay the bills. Also, it is not "Avatar" but "The Last Airbender" franchise as far as Viacom is concerned.

      Intelligence4 wrote:
      why do they even bother with the creator at all; why don't' they just make it themselves?

      Studios these days don't make stuff. They just have the money and the means to sell. The creative ones are the content creators who all compete for that money with their sales pitch. Mike and Bryan are one of the few creators who succeeded in selling their concept to Nick, after many many revisions. If Nick wants Sokka to be covered in Appa's snot to appeal to the Rugrats fanbase, so be it.

      Intelligence4 wrote:
      how much control does each party have over that?

      Last I checked, Nick owns all the rights with TLoK. With ATLA, Dark Horse has bought exclusive rights to publish the comics. Until that rights expires, Nick cannot publish their own ATLA comics or have Marvel or DC publish them. The interesting part is that our dear friend bought the movie rights before ATLA was even finished. At the time, Nick was not taking ATLA as seriously as Spongebob and Dora. The movie rights would not be worth much had Nick cancelled the show after Book 2, leaving the story incomplete.

      How do you even define a "complete story" in the contract when you buy the movie rights? One way is to stipulate that Nick must broadcast at least 20 episodes within two years of signing, and have a "gentlemen's agreement" with Mike and Bryan to finish the story within those 20 episodes, plus any additional episodes Nick is willing to finance.

      "The first thing we did when I met Mike and Bryan, and I came on - they hadn't finished season three. The first conversation was in my hotel room. "Dudes, I gotta know this. This is critical! This has to end. This has to end. If it doesn't end, I'm not on board. But if you don't want to end it - it's all good." They were like "no, we saw it as three seasons for each element that he has to learn." And I said "great." At that time they hadn't even decided where things were going to end, even like who Katara was going to end up with. All of that stuff hadn't been figured out yet. We had such amazing conversations in that room, but we all agreed, shook hands and said "It's over. We're gonna finish the tale." I said that I could definitely get behind that."
      Roundtable discussion with M. Night Shyamalan

      Here's the problem: his movie rights is not limited to those 3 Books but any new ATLA episodes or movies (like the proposed The Search TV movie. What is Nick's incentive to continue the shows only to have the movie rights owned by him? He can also include storylines from any comic books that Nick has created on ATLA. Fortunately, Dark Horse is willing to pay to have them published as "the lost adventures" AND expand the story knowing that Gene Yang's materials can be included in his movie.

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    • Well, that explains that. I love how batscat US copyright law is.

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    • so let me get this straight: bryke came to nick with an idea, nick told them what they were looking for, bryke changed it around a bit, then nick accepted the idea, and they hired bryke to make avatar for them, and since it was made for them, then they own it all. so despite the fact that it was bryke's idea, nick basically bought the idea from them, and paid them to make it.

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    • ^ Pretty much. Welcome to the real world. Icon_cry.gif

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    • my only issue is that it's considered work for hire even though bryke first came to nick...smh.

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    • Considering the massive fan base and the lack of merchandise...Nick needs to realize that Bryke can make them major $$$!

      I'm pretty sure we already talked about this on the other thread, but I find the response more appropriate to argue on here too.

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    • Wow, Hasdi. Awesome research.

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    • i'm still pretty damn sure he's secretly m night shamalan lol....or noah ringer or someone. :p

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    • Laughing. You're prolly right. How else could he get so much insider info. Of course if it's a matter of public (internet) record, he still had to know where to look.

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    • I don't think nickelodeon will ever lose avatar franchise rights to any company except maybe Disney.

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    • ^Agree. The Avatar franchise is about all Nick has that's any good (in my opinion...). Selling Avatar would be a major mistake on Nick's part and a huge gain for whatever company acquires it.

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    • Snarky-O'Snapper wrote:
      Selling Avatar would be a major mistake on Nick's part and a huge gain for whatever company acquires it.

      If their gain poses a threat to whatever IP that Nick is actively milking from, then Nick won't sell the Airbender franchise to them. However, it's also a problem if Nick does not have the vision or budget to develop a promising franchise that they refuse to sell. So that kinda puts the franchise in a limbo, stuck between life and death. And so, history repeats itself...

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    • Wait, the Avatar franchise can't legally be called the Avatar franchise?

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    • DarkNet1 wrote:
      Wait, the Avatar franchise can't legally be called the Avatar franchise?

      I don't know, so sue me.

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    • An anonymous contributor
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