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  • So what did you guys think of the premiere?

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    • It was a very good premiere. My only concerns about Southern Lights are the random barbarians and the lack of Asami.

      Everything else was simply AMAZING!!!

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    • I thought it was very impressive. The new characters did well, though I feel they could have picked a better VA for Bumi. The twins are definitely unnerving to some degree, but they weren't the "come play with us" type I was expecting, which I liked. Eska's interactions with Bolin were priceless. Varrik seems to have some potential, though I feel like the scenes with him, Bolin, and Asami didn't have much of a point in the context of the episode. His fast talking was entertaining, though. Unalaq played his role well, though I wish they had held off on the whole conquering zealot thing until later, maybe build him up more as a good guy first.

      The animation is absolutely fantastic: there's a sense of scope that simply wasn't there for most of the first season. Even the old places have gotten makeovers, like the Southern Air Temple (I'm so happy the temples are being looked after, by the way).

      The story was solid, and it left me wanting desperately for the next episode to come around.

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    • I was blown away and can't wait for the next episode.

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    • @air nomad critic. Glad I wasn't the only one who disliked bumi's voice

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    • Oddly enough, I thought Tonraq's voice (which is scientifically and unequivically awesome) would have been a better fit. More warrior like and less like what seemed to be a beurocrat's voice in my opinion.

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    • I kind of didnt like it so far. I know its not supposed to be exactly the same but, it just doesnt seem like the same universe anymore. The story also seems kind of like they just thought of some random crap so far.

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    • I really liked it and I loved that they are going to show the Air Temples! :3

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    • It was amazing!!! Almost cried a little bit when jinora was looking at aangs statue just like aang had done with avatar rokus statue! And I also loved the new characters! It was very humorous and epic. Just loved it. The only thing I would criticize is how obnoxious Korra is to mako and all the people who have been there for her since she was born -_- but overall it was great and I can't wait for the next episode!!! (Also it till feels like the same world to me because it shows how Korra struggles with the spirit world just like aang did in book 1 of ATLA. and also, I liked bumis voice! It reminded me of sokka! <3)

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    • the air temple was great, although i miss the design and animation from the southern air temple (ep 102, not the actual place...).

      i freakin' loved seeing the statue room, and was glad to see aang's statue there.

      when jinora got up in the middle of the night, was that avatar wan? and why was he glowing - it's just like ep 102 when aang went into the avatar state and all the statues lit up - seems strange.

      when eska became possessive of bolin at the end, was she psychic waterbending? i didn't see any motions, yet she created a stock and pillar for him.

      so it seems to me that book2 will focus on the water tribes, book 3 on the earth kingdom, and book 4 on the fire nation...

      loved the humor from the air acolyte lady not knowing about kya and bumi. that was great.

      just seems awsome to finally have it premiere. so surreal. but awsome.

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    • The statue was of avatar wan, and the statue lit up because at that same moment Korra opened the spirit portal and that beam of light with all the 'spiritual energy'caused the statues to light up (just like when aang caused the statues to light up in ATLA like u said) and I also feel like jinora got up because the spirits are like, calling her. Because there was that weird scene while she was looking at aangs statue where her eyes got small and it made a quick cut to another statue (quite weird) and i think that will lead up to jinora and Korra entering the spirit world together (like in the trailer). That will be cool because it will explain how a non avatar person can enter the spirit world (just like the myths about uncle iroh entering the spirit world)

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    • that was something i didn't understand: why did they have teh camera cut behind jinora really fast? nothing ever came of that shot, but it made me expect something was gonna happen.

      @tanc

      forgot to mention this in my last reply, but now that you point it out, bumi's voice does sound a little funny to me. quite honestly, tonraq's does as well.

      did anyone notice that in the trailers and previews the audio they paired with certain images was different than the actual episode?

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    • I think they did that weird cut to emphasize that jinora has some kind of special ability or connection to the spirit world and hopefully it gets explained more in the next episodes. And no I didn't notice the differences between the trailer and the premier.. Then again they did have a voice over narration going on in the trailer so that's probably why it sounded different.

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    • @Theavatarnate: Well they just started the episodes, and besides all we've seen are places that were never fully shown in the original series besides the Southern Air temple which only looks a different due to the restoration and whatnot. 

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    • the only thing i didn't like was the lack of asami in the Southern Lights.ALL the rest was perfect :D 

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    • I loved the premiere! This season is going to be so good!

      I am pretty pumped for next weeks episode... Mostly because I hope we see a little Katara retaliation later because of the warriors invading...AND...Did anybody else think: "But then everything changed when the Waterbenders attacked!" Because not going to lie, I did.

      Also, Varick and Eska.....I think I'm going to like them. XD

      Tonraq and Unalaq---banishment?  Mythical brother versus brawny brother---I'll just come out and say it---I am feeling some Thor and Loki stuff going on here.  Excited to see more of that!

      Jinora----glad she is getting some more depth!

      Pokie....so that was the lemur image leaked on here a while back....oh Meelo...

      Poor Asami...she has so much pressure going on in business right now, maybe we'll see more of her later?

      Lots of good humor in this episode, Bolin parts---all hilarious, I especially liked when the spirit got into their engine. Gold!

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    • TheAvatarNate wrote: I kind of didnt like it so far. I know its not supposed to be exactly the same but, it just doesnt seem like the same universe anymore. The story also seems kind of like they just thought of some random crap so far.


      Whow I personally thought "Rebel Spirit" and "The Southern Lights" topped "The Avatar State" and "The Cave of Two Lovers" for sure.

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    • It was a good premiere. my favorite part was in the southern air temple, in the statue room

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    • I enjoyed it very much, it is so good to see a location other than Republic City. I began to get sick of looking at it by the end of season one. Animation was fantastic as always, and I did think "and then the watertribe attacked" haha. I love Varick and Eska, they are unnerving, but not a really creepy unnerving, also I loved Eska and Bolin's interactions, they were hilarious. I do still have a slight issue with the pacing, but that is incredibly nitpicky. All in all, enjoyable, and I am really looking forward to the next episode!

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    • So do you guys think the sailors that encountered the spirits in the beginning of the episode were killed or just captured?

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    • Maybe they are just trapped in the Spirit World, like Sokka and those villagersf from "Winter Solstice, Part 1: The Spirit World".

      But if they are killed... oh well. How unfortunate.

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    • Am I the only one who mentally heard "Unleash the kraken!" during that scene?

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    • Loved this episode. It's only been two episodes in and already I like Desna, Eska, and Varrick. Which is kinda ironic, because when I first saw his character design and heard his name, I thought he'd just be plain stupid.

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    • It is going to SUCK waiting a week between episodes. I thought Breaking Bad was painful to wait for, but this is far worse! It's only been two episodes and Book Two is already so, so awesome. I'm crazy for the Water Tribe and the spirits, and this season is emphasizing them both. So many awesome things happened, I was grinning throughout the entirety of both episodes. Unalaq taming that spirit made my jaw drop, I'm so glad I stayed dark. Jinora, can't wait to see her arc. Too bad I already know about Wan, that was unavoidable. He popped up everywhere I looked, even in fanart.

      I love that they're addressing the consequences of one of the big complaints from Book 1: no spirituality and forcing the Avatar into seclusion instead of traveling the world. Also, was Rebel Spirit the only episode in the Avatar series with a cold open (scene before the title card)? That was awesome.

      "~Ooooh it's in the engine!~"

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    • At first, I didn't like how the Dark Spirits looked like a combination between the Heartless and Unversed from Kingdom Hearts, but now they remind me of the Night Walker from Princess Mononoke.

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    • The only thing I didn't like was that Asami had minor appearances in Rebel Spirit and she wasn't in The Southern Lights.I hope she won't be a minor character this book.

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    • Qin warns: DONT read this if you haven't seen the episodes.

      -------

      Sounds legit Atomic. the smaller ones do looks like the heartless from K.H however that wasn't much of a hassle, since they fight pretty much well, and mopped the floor even of a avatar state powered Korra. 

      The only correct way of dealing with them is solving through its roots: returning harmony back between both worlds. 

      I've found the first 2 episodes really great, and although some things I disliked [all the tech,Varick,Ginger,etc] for obvious reasons it was overall 2 great episodes full with spiritual stuff and knowledge, AND FINALLY some DECENT bending. 

      And no matter what people say, Unalaq IS correct on his quest. he might now go the villain route now with his army deployment idea [typical villain tactic,etc] however till so far he saved the lives of everyone with his spirit-bending, taught Korra things Tenzin himself couldn't teach and made her more self-confident [you're the avatar, the spirits of your past lives...] 

      The revamped Air Temple was simply gorgeous, beautiful architecture and lots of cool acolytes now. The only hassle I had was that one sweeper with a topknot and a headcloth (jin) in it. I really, seriously confused him with a Fire Nation male, since topknot buns are more FN like. 

      BUT since they aren't born airbenders, they could pretty much be WT/EK/FN people who went following these teachings isn't it? and not everyone have shaved heads so... [for FN people probably shaving heads is terrible, etc] 

      TANC: I had the 'unleash the kraken' feels there. >_<

      Mako improved a lot of course, and so do Korra. but the best aspect is that from what I've seen part of the bending seems more traditional and stuff. probably because instead of the URN savages, we're seing more of the cool WT people. 

      Second episode: first one without Shiro Shinobi narration. that was quite a relief for me, I've never been a fan of his style of narration anyways... 

      And now Unalaq is moving to part 2 of his plans, deploying troops to occupy the South that's it?? if that means the end of the crappy festival and the comeback of the REAL DEAL, the REAL glacier spirits festival, it's something interesting to see. 

      AT last but not least, I'm very happy to see they included a new culture, but a interesting looking one. These "barbarians" really reminds me of the Xiongnu [aka: Huns] of the Han dynasty. 

      Wan's statue was very interesting...  Jinora saw it and later it started to glow just like what Aang did back on ATLA. can't wait to see him in action. 

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    • @Qin Did you like the flashback?

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    • Of course. ;D although I do miss the smaller NWT capital, the capital still keeps its same visual [blue icy buildings, a bit Venice-styled,etc] and its people looks largely traditional so far, much better than the South. the south is just terrible >_< looks just like RC on ice, and thats why I support Unalaq. 

      But yes, it was a very cool flashback, and these 'barbarians' just added to it. 

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    • Yeah, I liked how Unalaq was not bullying his brother.

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    • @AtkaSura honestly? wait for this is worse than waiting for that epic Breaking Bad cliffhanger?


      anyway, like the walking dead,  this show seems like its taking itself to seriously now. all  the humor seems very forced and not fitting to the situations. its also not funny having a character thats pretty much only for comic relief. when shows dont take themselve too seriously, they turn out to be much better even if the audience takes it too seriously. thats how the first series was. thats how breaking bad is.

      i know the spirits are supposed to be wierd and mystical but, is anyone else wondering? uh, what the hell did korra do exactly? stuff just kind of happened. and these spirits arent very "avatary"

      but hey, i'll give it a chance and keep watching

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    • also, i just realized when was the last time there was a solid bending battle? like between two benders? korra vs amon/aang vs yakone doesnt really count, it wasnt interesting and was always lopsided one way or the other. everything has been benders vs nonbenders/technology/spirits.

      ...correct me if i'm wrong but, the last time there an interesting bending battle was aang vs ozai.

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    • I think Korra vs Tarrlok was the first actual bender vs. bender fight that actually looked like it could go either way on LOK.

      Well that fight does win the award for "Most Innovative Use of Indoor Waterfall" :D

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    • I agree and when two benders do fight it's probending where they're throwing rocks not boulders and using water whips not octopus form. It's just less impressive and powerful. It'd be nice to see two benders really duke it out again.

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    • ok, i forgot about tarlokk vs korra. that one is valid i guess but still not that great and its only ONE!

      not that i'm all about action but, bending battle have been an essential part of the avatar world.

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    • Curse the justin.tv. There are better livestream websites, like twitch.tv, which doesn't need some shitty pro access to watch unlimited vids W/O AD's.


      EDIT: twitch is only for gamers, but it's on Nick.com now, you can use tunnelbear VPN to watch it from europe.

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    • "The south looks just like RC on ice."

      It was a carnival, not a city. The stuff is taken down after the festival is over.

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    • This was not referent to the carnival itself. I was refering to the seemingly solid buildings and appearance of its people. ;D 

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    • Yea, Bryke probably made the South look like RC on ice so that the audience feels the same disappointment as Unalaq. Varrick and the spirits will not mix, something's going to happen to him.

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    • ^ *ding* *ding* *ding* We have a winner!

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    • something that i loved in the premiere was all the new technology that was introduced. loved seeing carnival rides, snow mobiles, and silent films in the avatar world. didnt even know that snow mobiles were around in the 1920s

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    • *SPOILERS* (I guess I should put that?)

      The new season shows serious promise! The concept of light and dark spirits kind of bugged me, but I really like the way the spirits look now. I feel like Korra took a good chunk of Tenzin's rationality for herself, because he seemed somewhat incompetent the whole hour.(though I think that was intentional) 

      I think the random barbarians in the Northern Water Tribe could actually help to flesh out the world even more.It just reminds of how flat the general idea of Avatar:ATLA politics are, and how LoK, though stumbling at it, still fleshes out the world. Also, the tundra that Zuko walked through in Siege of The North is now part of the city, which I thought was cool. 

      Looking forward to where this Northern occupation will take the show.

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    • I just want to say, the snow mobile came before the jet ski

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    • @atomic. really? interesting never knew that

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    • Ikr? So whenever people say, "snow mobiles are sooo stoopid and modern!!! They don't fit in!!!!" Just lay down the facts on them!

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    • Indeed. The Fire Nation had jet skis in TLA, I don't get why people would complain about snowmobiles.

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    • Did anyone else find the Dark Spirits odd? They looked nothing like the spirits we've encountered up to this point and were much more malicious in nature even more so than Hei Bai when he was angry.

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    • it bothered me at first since they kind of resembled the heartless from the kingdom hearts series, but i got used to it.

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    • I think the idea of a civil war storyline between the Water Tribes has a lot of potential. Where would the Foggy Swamp tribe fit into the conflict? One would assume that they've been interacting with their brethren over the last 70 years.

      I also like the character of Unalaq. He's obviously going to be the main antagonist, but he strikes me as a man with misguided intentions rather than an inherently villainous guy. Also, I also get the sense that the so-called Dark Spirits aren't really bad either. After all, the spirits only behave violently when things are out of balance. Even Koh the Face-Stealer won't attack unless you break certain rules. There something else going on there, and I can't wait to see what it is.

      The only think I didn't like was the Varrick character. A little too over-the-top, if you ask me.

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    • As I will probably keep saying, the spirits are hit-&-miss with me. It depends on the individual spirit's design whether or not I like them.

      I liked Varrick, if only for one line:

      "Why didn't you tell me I wasn't levitating? Now I look like an idiot!"

      Ginger appears for like 30 seconds, it's a little absurd that there are already so many complaints about her. Heck, for all we know, she wears older fashions when she's not working.

      Emperor Qin wrote: This was not referent to the carnival itself. I was refering to the seemingly solid buildings and appearance of its people. ;D 

      The buildings are solid, but they're still rather small huts, made of things like stone & wood. It's very probable that this is actually how the village looked before the Hundred Years War, especially when you consider that the north helped to rebuild them.

      This is, of course, not counting the outfits & the occasional lightbulb or snowmobile.

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    • I just want to know what they did with the old Fire Nation shipwreck

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    • ^i liked all the spirits from the first series. they werent too wierd.

      these ones are just really wierd now.

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    • ^ Most of the spirits we saw in TLA were ancient; as old as time itself (not sure about Hei Bai/Painted Lady). Maybe the design change is meant to indicate that these spirits are different somehow. Newer? Sub-spirits? Corrupted? Who knows.

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    • Maybe they're older.

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    • Light and Dark Spirits probably represent the balance of the world. The other Spirits (Hei Bei, Painted Lady, Koh, The Mother of Faces, Wan Shi Tong) represent certain aspects of the world. If the world is unbalanced, darkness takes over

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    • Meelo is actually kinda cute. Never thought I'd say that.... @Qin I kinda like Shiro Shinobi's narration. It does kinda fit with this more modern scheme, like he's on radio or something.

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    • @Atomic: Yea, We've seen both ancient spirits and spirits with a connection to the world ("Spirit of the Forest" or "Spirit of the River"). So far, these are just "Dark Spirits." Like you said, I'd guess that they're an indicator of spiritual imbalance.

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    • the dark spirits are only dark b/c the world is falling out of balance - i don't think they're always dark.

      "when they are out of balance, the darkness takes over."

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    • one thing i didn't like was how we got tonraq's backstory basis before it aired - it took all the shock value out of the part where he says i was banished and they cut to a commercial. would have been a lot better if that detail was kept secret or the scene wasn't meant for shock value.

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    • I have to say, I wasn't disappointed.  My sister and I refused to  budge while watching it, and I say it was worth it.  I'm going to miss Republic City, it's beautiful, but I do adore the Water Tribes and can't wait to see that conflict.

      I didn't like Varrick, though I didn't like him when I saw his design either.  I didn't like Ginger.  It wasn't the sex appeal, or the attire, but her hair color that killed me.  That clearly fake, standing out red hair is hideous compared to the many dark haired characters.  I figure yeah, hair dye probably exists in universe, but that red makes her stick out and look rough.

      I didn't like Bumi's voice that much.  It just didn't seem to fit him.  

      I also don't like how Unaloq seems to be our antagonist.  I liked having Tarrlok and Noatak, water benders being villainous for a change was cool, but another one and so soon?  It might grow on me in time, but I'm not enjoying it so far.

      The twins, oh glory!  Last season Amon kept giving me Fatal Frame (my favorite game series, but also a big nightmare inducer) flashbacks by his actions.  The twims horribly remind me of the Kiryu twins, the worst, most scary set of ghost twins in the series.  It was to the point that every time I saw them I stifled a scream.  I did love Desna's voice, though.

      I do adore Jinora, she's my favorite of Tenzin's children, and her being spiritual is amazing!  I love the spiritual focus on this season as well, and I look forward to it.  I know this was more negative than positive, but other than the negative points, I really loved this.  We're eagerly waiting for more.

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    • @Intelligence And that's why I stayed dark on all things Book Two (well, as dark as possible. Unfortunately, Wan popped up everywhere).

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    • AtomicPsychology wrote:
      At first, I didn't like how the Dark Spirits looked like a combination between the Heartless and Unversed from Kingdom Hearts, but now they remind me of the Night Walker from Princess Mononoke.

      My friend said the spirits look like they're from M.I.

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    • LOLs at people getting upset over Ginger (sorry, I just find it funny because I'll bet the creators could care less about whatever reasons people would find to get upset, otherwise she wouldn't even have been put in there there). I think there's bigger things to be upset about, if anything.

      "I love that they're addressing the consequences of one of the big complaints from Book 1: no spirituality and forcing the Avatar into seclusion instead of traveling the world."

      YES. This. I had serious qualms with Book 1's finale, despite liking most of Book 1 as a whole. People are upset that Korra's being so immature? I predicted that, and saw it coming, and narratively that makes SENSE to me, because how can you expect her to grow up when all she did at the end of Book 1 was ignore everyone's advice, make bad decisions, and try to use violence to solve her problems? When you're immature like Korra, you arne't going to learn to change and grow if people (looking at you, Avatar Aang) just magically solve your problems (that YOU cause and bring on yourself) for you with a little deus ex machina magic.

      I'm hoping Korra will actually face some consequences for her rash decisions and learn from her mistales and grow. Given how she's acted with Unalaw, it seems she hasn't even learned from her experience with Tarrlok, though. >_>;

      The production values of these two episodes pleased me, but the writing just didn't really sell me. I dunno. The pacing is too fast, too much plotty-plot gritty-dark tragic-Water Tribe-Brother-Backstory stuff (gee, where have I heard that one before?), and...ehhhh. I have faith it'll get better, but as of right now, the premiere spent too much time trying to cram new ideas and new plot and new characters down our throats when what it could stand to do is SLOW DOWN for a second, show us these characters we still don't really know that well, develop them a bit.

      And then there's the matter of the plot of Legend of KORRA still, even now, not being about KORRA'S decisions or choices but (once again) about the decisions of grumpy old men around here. I can't wait to see where it goes, but I admit I'll a little disappointed that it didn't knock me off my feet yet. ALL of my favorite parts so far had to do with the subplots (Tenzin and his family) than with Korra or her story. Still, though, even though the animation studio was different, I was still happy with the animation, some pretty fluid parts in frames I didn't expect, the voice actors mostly did a solid job, music was fab as usual, the story is trying to push some important themes along and I can't wait to see if it reaches its potential this time. So there's good and bad -- light and dark -- that I found in this premiere. I'm just a little worried that the 'dark' writing might overtake the balance and create chaos, like what happened with Book 1's finale (IMO).

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    • I payed more attention to animation, went bored on half of first episode (i watched on Nick.com), didn't even pay attention to TSL. Excited about Civil Wars: P1.

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    • Southern Lights reminded me of HP Lovecrafts "Mount's of Madness".

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    • Ginger is in fact a rather irrelevant character, regarding the plot so far, that was there just for the show and another one of Verick's way of getting rich, so it's pretty much the reality of her character. 

      But I don't think fans are going against her. The only visible objection I've noticed is regarding the color of her hair, but overall opinion is relatively good/positive on her. 

      It's not like everyone is Qin, which hated her from the FIRST preview picture.

      Now, Destiny-Smasher, I can assure that book2 is probably becoming a better one because the issues left aside on the first book such as spirituality has seemingly returned. 

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    • I think you posted on the wrong page Qin.

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    • Well, I think so, but this was a reply to the 1st paragraph of Destiny smasher >_< 

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    • I still don't see an issue with the color of Ginger's hair, especially since we don't even know if it's died or not. And if it's not, they've already made characters modelled directly after Caucasians. Race and ethnicity doesn't seem to work in this fantasy world quite the same way it does in ours or else a character like The Doorman can't physically exist and look the way he does, if Caucasians don't exist in that world. Since he's, you know, a Caucasian-based character, modelled directly after a Caucasian man. So looks aren't everything, nor should they be, IMO.

      I'm very curious to see if Varrick ends up being the method through which Bolin gets thrown into the actual plot this time, though. I want to see him actually grow up a bit in this season, instead of just being everyone else's chew toy.

      @Noob32 - Wait, so you just skipped episode 2? Haha. Don't you think that might make the next episode a little hard to tell what's going on?

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    • In the end its all one race [the human] one, and I do consider more things such as rituals,culture and tradition as defining one people/nation instead of merely race. specially when China itself started as a massive confederation of different tribes, then statelets ruled inside awesome walled cities, then huge warring states until it became one unified empire. 

      Anyways the doorman doesn't looked Asian at all, as with many URN characters may I mind you. At first he looked like a preacher or something with his "the revelation is upon us, brothers and sisters" but anyways... 

      Back to Bolin, I REALLY hope he gets additional development on this season. He was quite Forever Bolone on season1, and I want to see more of him. 

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    • "Anyways the doorman doesn't looked Asian at all"

      Right, that was exactly my point. I've been bothered in the past by people who seem to care a great deal about 'race' in Avatar, which is always weird to me because it is inspired by real-life races/cultures but it is a fantasy world, so 'race' wouldn't all be the same as ours. So you have characters like The Doorman or Smellerbee or Pipsqueak or the Earth King or who don't really look the same as most other characters, IMO. It is a cartoon, and a fantasy world, so that is OK! But some people can get very worked up over it. >_>;

      "In the end its all one race [the human] one"

      Yes, that is how I feel, too!

      "We are share the same roots, and we are all branches of the same tree."

      Haha, Forever Bolone? I haven't heard that one, haha! I'm definitely worried that he will get abused in this season, and I get the impression the creators of him maybe don't even care about him as much as some of the fans do! Haha.

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    • Although I do believe the people on their world is largely Asian looking. and of course, asian people is very diverse itself so...

      Smellerbee/Pipsqueak is rather different, as most of Jet's band. The Earth King Kuei really looks like this one :D 

      Nice quote ^_^

      Forever Bolone haha!! because not just on shipping Bolin is left alone but also on friendship and other highlights, instead it going to Mako or other person. I actually want to see more focus on Bolin, he's a interesting character and I hope they focus a bit more on him this season. 

      [although the character design bugs me off... damn URN!! Bolin should look like Haru and so do Mako]

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    • Pretty much everyone in ATLA/Legend Of Korra is Asian/Inuit/Native American. While Bryan and Mike have never directly stated what ethnicity the characters are, many of the people involved with both shows say they Are. Even if they aren't asian, they are at the very least not white.


      The reason Anime Characters are drawn with big eyes and more western looking features is because of two reasons.

      1. Osamu Tezuka, the "godfather of Manga' who is credited with creating the Manga and Anime style was hugely inspired by Disney. The big eyes and simplistic features compounded with relatively realistic backgrounds are obviously apparent in both disney films and his artwork. Cartoonist/Theorist/Essayist Scott McCloud calls this the "Masking Effect." The Japanese Refer to it as Mukokuseki. Where a characters appearance is made more simplistic and less realistic to make it easier for the audience to relate to them.

      http://www.neverenoughworlds.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Masking-Effect.png

      2. In Japan/Asia it is taken for granted that most anime characters (unless otherwise stated) are Japanese/Asian. Since for the most part Japan is ethnically homogenous (with precious few exceptions). But such presumption is lost in Mainstream American entertainment. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ANO8kyWgXKs&list=UUrdBS7lq_VnA7B_NvGzsaOw&index=17

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    • ^Perfectly said, besides lets add that Japanese animation/manga had influences from traditional japanese paintings such as Ukiyo-e, and the japanese drawings and woodblocks are VERY expressive, putting a larger emphasis on the characters expression and these other visual aspects.

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    • I really disliked it. Korra's incessant immaturity was incredibly annoying. I'd hoped she might have grown as a person at least a little since the ending of Book 1, but apparently not. It doesn't help that she's incredibly naive in just dumbly accepting everything her ominous and mysterious estranged uncle says despite the advice of her trusted teacher and her own father. She can't be bothered to take Mako's advice when he clearly thinks Tenzin is right, either, but then she becomes angry when he simply offers his unconditional support instead.

      Korra still hasn't even come close to proficiency in airbending, and her spiritual development is nil.

      I didn't find any of the attempts at humor at all entertaining. I think the worst was inside the Air Temple Sanctuary where Jinnora and Tenzin were watching the statues and suddenly Meelo and Ikki go screaming by. I mean, come on. We get it already. Tenzin's children are not perfect and wonderful serene little Aang clones. They don't have to hammer us with the fact literally every single time they appear on screen. Jinnora is the only one of Tenzin's children who is remotely sympathetic or interesting.

      I liked the twins, Eska and whatever the other's name is. Bolin's new servitude is kind of amusing. I liked Asami and Bolin going to strike a deal with Varrick, that was some interesting worldbuilding, though I think they dragged out Varrick's pontificating for a bit too long.

      I find Unalaq and Tonraq boring. Unalaq's manipulation of Korra is absurdly transparent, Tonraq bungles the whole thing, and it just seems absurdly convienient that he has such a lurid backstory. And obviously there has to be some trick involved with Unalaq's calming of the so-called "spirits". That, or we're throwing the whole idea of the Avatar as the "bridge between worlds" in the trash and allowing any random waterbender to do that.

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    • Zuko acted the same way up until halfway through Book Two: hotheaded, stubborn, rejecting the advice of the people who care for him, trusting those he shouldn't (Azula). Yet, Korra gets all the flak. Aang didn't properly firebend until book three, outright refusing to do so. He was reckless with fire just like Korra with air. He turned down further firebending training for selfish reasons, she stopped further airbending training due to a clear and present threat, yet again- Korra gets all the hate. Everyone expects her to suddenly be proficient with elements she's just discovered. Aang hadn't even mastered waterbending by the start of Book Two. TLA had roughly 61 episodes of character/story development, with many of those characters making poor decisions. Aang hid the instructions to Hadoka from Katara and Sokka, everyone was "bitchy" during "The Chase," etc. Those built character, give Korra time to do the same. We're only at episode 14, that's right around "The Storm," where TLA really started to kick off.

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    • Yeah, I feel like people are using Korra as wish fulfillment. You all know darn well that you'd fight with your parents over far less than them locking you into a compound for about a decade. It's like people want her to be perfect, that is NOT the same as character development.

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    • Yea. Again, using Zuko as an example: he had some of the most extensive character development of all, spanning three seasons. Using Korra critic logic, he should have just started out as a humbled Fire Lord. If Korra's a flawless Avatar from episode two, what remains for Books Three and Four? Nothing.

      Regarding spirituality. Korra admitted to being a spiritual failure in Book One, and I think Bryke did an amazing job explaining why in Book Two. Aang was born into a culture steeped in spirituality, yet even he didn't know what to do when confronted with Hei Bai. Korra, on the other hand, lived in forced seclusion; raised by a father who is shown to make rash decisions and is the antithesis of spirituality. Of course she's spiritually stunted!

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    • "Pretty much everyone in ATLA/Legend Of Korra is Asian/Inuit/Native American. While Bryan and Mike have never directly stated what ethnicity the characters are, many of the people involved with both shows say they Are. Even if they aren't asian, they are at the very least not white."

      Well, except they can't be those races, since they exist on earth -- not in that fantasy world. So, no, they are not races from our world, technically,, but they are definitely based upon, representative of, and inspired by real-life races and cultures. And that is what makes Avatar's world so fascinating, is that it combines western ideas with those eastern inspirations, combining into a story and world that is not quite fully eastern and not quite fully western but an express of both styles and mentalities. It physically cannot be only an expression of eastern culture because it was created and written by westerners, and it can't be only an expression of western culture because it is inspired by and produced by easterners. Its very existence as a series is a combination of both sides, trying to keep each other in balance.

      But in regards to appearance, if they are indeed supposed to not have any people based on "white" people, why are there people based on white people, then? Why are there people who don't look like any real race of people? (because it's a fantasy world, that's why). So tryign to say "they are all Asians" is not only confusing since Asia doesn't exist there, it's all confusing that characters like The Doorman and others are modelled after white people, because if their intent was to move away from any "white" representation whatever, that wouldn't happen in the first place. And people got upset when the live action movie utilized Indian people/culture for Fire Nation, so it's not just a matter of "white" or not. But it all comes back to what I said before: it's a fantasy world. The same races that exist in our world don't exist in theirs. If they did, all of the same races would, but they don't. So obviously that stuff isn't the same. They are inspired by Asian/Inuit/Native American people, based upon them, but not actually those races, because those races don't physically exist in this world (or else Asia and America would, too, and consequently African, European, and other races). This means they can have more fantasy elements and traits that we do not have, like bending, or shark-shaped eyebrows, or crazy spiky sideburns.

      And I absolutely love-love-love that the creators are, for the most part, inspired by cultures and people-groups that are under-represented in western media. That is wonderful and amazing.

      "In Japan/Asia it is taken for granted that most anime characters (unless otherwise stated) are Japanese/Asian. Since for the most part Japan is ethnically homogenous (with precious few exceptions). But such presumption is lost in Mainstream American entertainment."

      I don't think 'presumption' is lost on Americans, I think that we specifically look at the world in non-homogenous way -- it's the culture and the people that live here, which are often the opposite of homogenized. We are trained, especially over the past few years, to be super aware and conscious of people's differences of heritage (which has its bad side along with its good side). The whole idea of our country is harmony and unity of all races and all cultures. And our coutnry does not succeed at that all of the time. But times are always changing, and step by step it feels like it has been getting better -- much better than it was only 100 years ago, I'd say.

      The fact that Americans can work with Koreans in unity to create an amazing animated show that has fascinating kid AND adult characters in a world and story that combines ideas from many places and inspirations is a wonderful feat.

      I just wish the writing was paying more attention to Legend of Korra, not Legend of Everyone Else Besides Korra. ^_^;

      "Yeah, I feel like people are using Korra as wish fulfillment. You all know darn well that you'd fight with your parents over far less than them locking you into a compound for about a decade. It's like people want her to be perfect, that is NOT the same as character development."

      No way, not from me! I love how flawed Korra is. I love that she has clearly defined strengths and weaknesses. I don't want her to be "perfect," like Superman. That would be boring.

      What I want is to see her change. Whether you're stagnant and being perfect, or stagnant and refusing to grow up, both are not the same as character development.

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    • Lol

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    • "Yea. Again, using Zuko as an example: he had some of the most extensive character development of all, spanning three seasons. Using Korra critic logic, he should have just started out as a humbled Fire Lord. If Korra's a flawless Avatar from episode two, what remains for Books Three and Four? Nothing."

      Well, except Zuko wasn't the Avatar or the Title character. But yes, I agree, Korra should not be perfect. That is not at all what I am arguing. I like that she is so flawed and making dumb decisions. What I don't like is the plot being about old men drama instead of about her. How can she learn anything, how can she grow and be more spiritual, if her story isn't about her at all? My criticism isn't with Korra as a character -- not at all, I love her, she's fascinating and realistic as a teenage woman -- my issue is with the narrative not doing anything with her character and instead obsessing with Water Tribe Bro Problems. =P

      Which I am sure will change! But I was left a little disappointed that it still hasn't after a year and a half wait.

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    • I'm just growing frustrated with people complaining about her perfectly understandable behavior. This isn't like when she went after Amon because she just "had a feeling," she's really thinking about what she needs to do. Of course she's mad at Tonraq, he's been possessive of & hiding important things from her, he even admits that she has every right to be angry. Getting mad at Mako isn't as logical, but it makes sense that she would be on-guard from feeling betrayed, & she apologizes at the end of the episode. Besides, Mike & Bryan clearly wanted to show that they have to work at their relationship, & I thought people would like that Mako was getting crap.

      By no means do my complaints generalize to everyone.

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    • @Neo Whether or not her behavior is "perfectly understandable" seems to consistently come down to how young or old people are, in all of the discussions I've had in regards to this. Which leads me to believe it is in fact less about "good or bad" decisions, "right or wrong" and more about maturity. Having good reasons to be a jerk to people doesn't change the fact that she's being a jerk to people. Which is how I always felt about Zuko, BTW, so it was good to see him gradually grow up, and I look forward to Korra hopefully doing the same.

      I'm not denying that Korra has reasons. As I've already said, I am fine with her, as a character, making the choices she did because I think it will lead to interesting storytelling. It is not, however, a smart decision. It's quite rash, actually -- but that's Korra's character, which is fine. I expect she will face consequences for her decisions and will learn from them. Her getting mad at mako was just hormonal teenage frustration, which I thought was fine. And, as she put it: "being the Avatar is hard." That was fine. She's still being hormonal and "a pain," though.

      Some people would like seeing Mako getting crap for what he did in Book 1 -- instead, we saw him getting crap for giving Korra the space to make her own decisions about her own life and being supportive about being there for her. I don't think people wanted that, I think people wanted Mako (and Korra alike) getting called out on their immaturity. I especially liked in Book 1 episode 8 when Tarrlok did exactly that, and she only fed into his judgment by doing exactly what was discussed: going to extremes to get what she wanted. And she paid for it. I liked that a lot. But I'm not sure she learned much from it.

      "& she apologizes at the end of the episode"

      Yes! This I loved. A lot. Such a simple thing, but that was some character development. The concern I have is that come next episode, or two or three more down the road, she'll slip back into her habits shown here and repeat the same mistake.

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    • It's great that you see it as sensible from a writing standpoint, but I tend to take what people say at face value, & what most people seem to be saying is that Korra is being annoying & should stop. Really, I've been getting this vibe that people expect perfection out of her since Book 1, & it seems to be for various reasons--comparing her to Aang, the fact that she's a girl, shipping....

      But I digress. I don't know if I'd even call the apology "real development." It feels like it was blatantly tacked onto the end to calm people down. It would have felt more natural if she did it during the next episode--if ever. Sometimes, people just get over things. Zuko yells at a lot of people in Season 3, he never apologizes for it, & it all works out, because he makes his feelings known with ACTIONS, not with WORDS. I liked this approach to his character, it made him feel more genuine.

      Training with Unalaq was a smart decision. The only thing people have against it is that she doesn't know him--he's her uncle--& he's "obviously evil," which is inane reasoning. The Fire Lord was obviously evil. You don't expect characters to behave like they're fictional characters, like they know who the bad guys are.

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    • "It feels like it was blatantly tacked onto the end to calm people down. It would have felt more natural if she did it during the next episode--if ever. Sometimes, people just get over things. Zuko yells at a lot of people in Season 3, he never apologizes for it, & it all works out, because he makes his feelings known with ACTIONS, not with WORDS. I liked this approach to his character, it made him feel more genuine."

      Except words are the most effective and realistic means of communicating apologies. Actions can certainly work, too, of course, and be more powerful, but Zuko did apologize to the main character he hurt the most: Iroh. And he also apologized to the Gaang. And he did this with both words and actions.

      Just not apologizing at all? Just expecting people to "get over it?" That's kind of selfish and a little self-righteous depending on the situation. It's that thinking that leads to crap like the love drama nonsense in Book 1, expecting others to put up with your own immaturity, to not talk about problems...it's an issue I'd argue that a lot of the younger generation has these days: we're collectively too cowardly and immature to face the music when we make a mistake that we run away from it instead and expect everyone else to "get over it." That is sometimes realistic, but it's not character growth, and it promotes immature messages.

      Effective communication requires give and take from both sides, not just one.

      So yes, her apologize to Mako was actual character development because it showed that hey, Korra actually cares about Mako enough to stop and think (something she's not prone to doing much of) and take someone else's feelings into consideration instead of just her own. It's ironic that she's so self-important and self-absorbed yet the actual writing/plot continues to throw her aside time and again.

      "Training with Unalaq was a smart decision."

      But completely dismissing Tenzin was not. She made a rash choice fueled by emotion that Unalaw manipulated into her by bringing up past events so he could use her toward his own gains. And did she even train with Unalaq? Oh, right. She did not. Unalaq led her to the woods and told her to open a portal. That's not training. Korra thinks like she's in an RPG game, where beating stuff up gets her experience points, but that's not exactly how life works, and it's not how being the Avatar or bending the elements works, either. I cite as my evidence her feeling that 'defeating Amon' means she has mastered airbending. Which is pretty silly for multiple reasons.

      It's implied that Unalaq maybe started showing her that waterbending technique to relax spirits, since she tried (and failed) to do it. And I did like that she tried that, but we don't even know if that was something that was trained or just her trying to mimic what she saw earlier.

      In ATLA Aang actually trained and disciplined himself. Korra is having none of that, and while that can make for an interesting story in the short term, it also can lead to problems in the long run. Which, again, is totally fine and I actually like that dynamic a lot, as long as it leads to actual character development this time, unlike Book 1's ending.

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    • "Except words are the most effective and realistic means of communicating apologies. Actions can certainly work, too, of course, and be more powerful, but Zuko did apologize to the main character he hurt the most: Iroh. And he also apologized to the Gaang. And he did this with both words and actions."

      And those worked FOR THOSE SCENES. But anymore, I feel like people want instant emotional gratification, burn on subtlety. I didn't believe that Korra was delivering a sincere apology, I felt that her actress was giving us the moral of the story. It's such a small thing, a complaint I wouldn't even normally make, were it not for the fact that I can almost smell Bryke trying to guard against another tidal wave of rage. This is clearly something that's gotten to them, I'm told that most of their commentary on Book 1 was defending Mako, Mike put out a blog post asking what people thought about the new setting, & Bryan put one out retorting to the angry Tumblr people ranting about racebending the characters. I don't like that things are getting to the point where they feel the need to carefully measure their words so as to not raise the ire of the fans.

      "Unalaq led her to the woods and told her to open a portal. That's not training."

      It actually is, it's field work, but whatever.

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    • " It's such a small thing, a complaint I wouldn't even normally make, were it not for the fact that I can almost smell Bryke trying to guard against another tidal wave of rage."

      Except that as far as we're aware, all of the writing AND voice acting for Book 2 had to have been done BEFORE the 'tidal wave of rage' on Book 1, just because of how long animation takes -- and they've already said that the voice acting happens before animation even starts. So even if it got to them, its impact on Book 2 would have been minimal to the point where I don't think it applies. So you shouldn't get so defensive on their behalf about this, because it's not actually a factor given what they've said about the production of this series.

      And no, I don't want "instant gratification." I'm sure there are some who do. But I don't. What I want is in fact subtlety -- something LoK handled very well with adult characters, I felt, like Lin and Tenzin and Tarrlok. But with the teenage characters they shove stuff in our face too much.

      As for the "moral of the story," if the story doesn't HAVE a moral or a message, then what is the point in telling it at all? There's nothing wrong with having a "moral" to the story -- in fact, stories that don't have one sometimes don't hold up very well. Korra apologized to Mako, and they had a cute little moment of healthy communciation. We saw her have a similar moment with Tenzin in Book 1, and at least another one with Bolin. That's healthy communication, that fosters trust and friendaship. If they had spent more time dwelling on it then yea, that would've been annoying. But they didn't. Communication, man: it's important to relationships. I want subltey, too, but I still want to see what the characters are feeling, thinking, and see them making decisions for themselves. And if they're learning nothing at all in their story, then it begs the question what the story is even about to me.

      "Field work," you say? Hm, where have I had that one before? Oh, right, that's what Tarrlok took her on. And once again, where did that go for Korra? =P Seems like she maybe didn't learn too much from that experience. So I'm just confused as what she learned from this "training" Unalaq took her on. Anything she learned is theoretical at this point, because we still don't know if everything Unalaq said is true, nor do we know if Korra's actions will benefit her people or not -- they might actually hurt the Southern Tribe, for all we know.

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    • "So you shouldn't get so defensive on their behalf about this, because it's not actually a factor given what they've said about the production of this series."

      I don't know how you figure this, the rage started very early on, & it spent a huge time in development.

      "And no, I don't want "instant gratification." I'm sure there are some who do. But I don't. What I want is in fact subtlety -- something LoK handled very well with adult characters, I felt, like Lin and Tenzin and Tarrlok. But with the teenage characters they shove stuff in our face too much."

      Agreed. And "I'm sorry I'm just under so much stress because being the Avatar is hard" is part of that. I know that, because I wasn't asleep. Reconcile emotionally without summarizing what I just watched.

      "As for the "moral of the story," if the story doesn't HAVE a moral or a message, then what is the point in telling it at all?"

      Entertainment. To make the audience think. Trying to force an obvious moral just for the sake of having one is not a good thing.

      "There's nothing wrong with having a "moral" to the story -- in fact, stories that don't have one sometimes don't hold up very well."

      I've noticed that continuity & development often get sacrificed for the sake of the "moral."

      "Anything she learned is theoretical at this point, because we still don't know if everything Unalaq said is true, nor do we know if Korra's actions will benefit her people or not -- they might actually hurt the Southern Tribe, for all we know."

      What point are you even trying to make, here? First you said that Korra's decision wasn't smart, then you conceded that going with Unalaq was but rejecting Tenzin wasn't, then you said that Unalaq didn't train her, now you're saying that the outcomes of this venture might hurt the Southern Water Tribe.

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    • "I don't know how you figure this, the rage started very early on, & it spent a huge time in development."

      Because animatiomn takes freaking long. The writing had to have been finished before Book 1 even started airing if they wanted to produce Book 2 even now. Pretty sure Bryan even said while Book 1 was airing about how they were already working on Book 2's production before Book 1 even finished airing. Which would mean the first two episodes writing would quite certainly have already been written by that point. As I said, Book 4 was already being worked on before Book 2 even started airing. Production cycles on Korra seem longer than other animated shows, which is apparent in how lovely the presentation is.

      Bryan and Michael didn't even seem aware of fan backlash toward Mako until after Book 1 was done. The Book 1 disc commentary was recorded like, last winter, as I recall, so by then they would've been aware of the backlash, and they seemed highly defensive about Mako for some reason. They generally don't look toward the fanbase for opinions when forming their stories, from what I can tell. And Book 2 has other writers on the team now, so I'd figure that if anyone was concerned about making Mako out to be more calm and less crazy, it was one of the other writers.

      "Reconcile emotionally without summarizing what I just watched."

      There's a symbol in the top left of each Korra episode that pops up when an episode starts up: Y-7. Need I say more? Unfortunately, maybe, for older fans, but so it is. I get you, though.

      What's more baffling to me is how they seem to want to tell more adult-oriented stories but can't quite commit. I think balance is the key with resolving issues with the characters. Not being too blunt, and not ignoring the problem, either. What you were suggesting implied that you think the characters should just magically forget when they have problems and never exercise healthy communication. Just be immature and let their negative emotions build up inside them over time and make things worse. That sort of idea is one I completely disagree with. Yes, as you said, it can be more realistic, and it can definitely be good storytelling, as long as there's a point besides it just being angsty. I do agree that they don't need to overstay the apologies -- which they certainly did not in Korra's apology to Mako. It lasted all of thirty seconds after like two or three scenes of her being a jerk to him.

      I'd be curious to know how you interpret the phrase "character development" because to me, part of that entails conveying to the audience, through a character's words and actions, that development has actually taken place. Otherwise it's just theoretical.

      "Entertainment. To make the audience think. Trying to force an obvious moral just for the sake of having one is not a good thing."

      I agree with the last sentence. But entertainment and making an audience think don't go hand-in-hand. They can, but that is not their nature when put together. This is exactly why Book 1's ending was so thematically dissonant, why The Search is upsetting people: Michael himself even confirmed it. They just want 'to surprise' people, essentially. To paraphrase how Mike put it, 'People want surprises, right? If there's no surprises, it's boring!' Sure, that's entertaining -- but not rewarding, and doesn't necessarily make people think past the initial shock value moment. The original Avatar series usually did pretty well and making its plot points, its entertainment, weave around a thoughtful narrative, a worthwhile set of "morals" that were indeed shown through action rather than blurted out by the characters. I'm more interested in theming, character development, and plot that supports those two things, rather than artifiace and short-term shock value.

      So I'm with you in showing is better than telling here, but with interpersonal relationships, telling is PART of showing because talking is a big part of how people communicate.

      A story often won't make an audience think it there is no underlying message. Now, mind, sometimes the underlying message is a question, rather than a statement. But a story without a message doesn't invite much thought.

      "I've noticed that continuity & development often get sacrificed for the sake of the "moral.""

      And I've seen continuity and development get sacrified for the sake of ditching a moral or message that was built up toward. (See: Legend of Korra Book 1) Without some message, theme, statement, or question at the base of a story, it loses weight. It loses meaning. I just don't want to see Legend of Korra give in to those cheap thrills too much, because ATLA wouldn't be what it is if it had done that.

      What point are you even trying to make, here? First you said that Korra's decision wasn't smart, then you conceded that going with Unalaq was but rejecting Tenzin wasn't, then you said that Unalaq didn't train her, now you're saying that the outcomes of this venture might hurt the Southern Water Tribe.

      I didn't actually 'concede' that going with Unalaq was a smart decision. I just said that her dismissing Tenzin was a bad one -- I didn't make a comment one way or the other because I don't really know if trusting Unalaq was a smart decision, but I'm leaning on "no." I definitely don't think it was 'smart' but I'd be interested to see your argument as to why you do. Especially given that I have a funny feeling within the next couple of episodes it will be proven to have been about as "smart" as when Korra worked with Tarrlok.

      So the point I'm trying to make is that I don't see what Korra learned from Unalaq in these two episodes. I don't see how he "trained" her at all. All I see so far is her making "Korra Choices" (in Janet Varney's words), making decisions out of a desire to punch things rather than a desire to learn or grow. Which is expected -- that's her character. That's her personality. And she is trying. I agree with Mako that her heart is in the right place, and I love her as a character. But she needs no fan's defense, because her making unhealthy decisions at this point in the story is not only in-character but the means to which she will most likely learn, as Korra is the sort who seems to learn only through facing consequences for her mistakes -- which didn't happen in Book 1, ergo, she didn't retain much from its events.

      Anyway, this has been fun. Thank you for the discussion (everyone)! I will have to unfollow this post now, however, as I have story writing of my own I should be doing. ^_^;

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    • "I'd be curious to know how you interpret the phrase "character development" because to me, part of that entails conveying to the audience, through a character's words and actions, that development has actually taken place. Otherwise it's just theoretical."

      It has to not be contrived. This didn't sound like dialogue to me, it sounded like a scripted response. And suppose, just for the sake of argument, that I'm right, & this was only put in there to hedge potential backlash. That would mean that it's not going to be korralated with any future developments--in subsequent episodes, Korra will be brash, or she will be humble, completely independent of this scene.

      "A story often won't make an audience think it there is no underlying message. Now, mind, sometimes the underlying message is a question, rather than a statement. But a story without a message doesn't invite much thought."

      Let me give you an example: Death Note. It's such a thoughtful story about everything from what's ethical to what is love & family to the role of religion, right? In fact, that's completely wrong. In the guidebook, it's stated that there is no moral to Death Note, it was never intended for fans to debate these subjects, & until being asked about it, the author & illustrator never really thought about which characters were "good" & which were "bad." It was pure entertainment. But it was so clever, & good at what it did, that it made people think regardless.

      "I've noticed that continuity & development often get sacrificed for the sake of the "moral.""

      "And I've seen continuity and development get sacrified for the sake of ditching a moral or message that was built up toward. (See: Legend of Korra Book 1)"

      That's reaching. How do we know that the moral was ditched? We were consistently told that Amon was an extremist. In the end, he turns out to be an extremist.

      "specially given that I have a funny feeling within the next couple of episodes it will be proven to have been about as "smart" as when Korra worked with Tarrlok."

      The future outcomes are totally irrelevant to whether or not it was an intelligent decision. She is not a prophet. By that logic, you shouldn't criticize her actions in the Book 1 finale, because they worked, & were therefore smart.

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    • they said they were going to make TLOK a more mature show but, in honestly seems much less mature than the first series. it is actually feeling like a kid's show now.

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    • The LOK Book Two premiere was terrible.

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    • TheAvatarNate wrote: they said they were going to make TLOK a more mature show but, in honestly seems much less mature than the first series. it is actually feeling like a kid's show now.

      I see LoK as being much more morally ambiguous than the first series, & much more willing to focus on its adult characters, though certain aspects I did feel were amazingly immature, as though they felt that they had to "balance it out" somehow.

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    • i thought bumi was funny when he pinched tinzins cheeks and said it is 247 bumi time that was harlaious

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